Bow Tie Cinema to bring 10-screen theater to Poughkeepsie

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POUGHKEEPSIE – The proposed Bow Tie Cinema project slated for a portion of the Crannell Street parking lot in Poughkeepsie received a substantial financial boost from New York State earlier this month.  

According to the city’s Community Engagement Director, John Penney, Bow Tie will be receiving $2 million in state funding for their $11 million project which will bring a 10-screen movie theater with a restaurant and bar to the parking lot near the historic Chance Theater.  

The building is planned to be 40,000 square feet and will create between 40 and45 permanent jobs while drawing an estimated 300,000 visitors to the city annually.

The state funding, announced last week is coming from the Regional Economic Development Council (REDC) initiative, created in 2011.  The 10 REDC’s around the state are public-private partnerships made up of local experts and stakeholders from business, academia, local government, and non-governmental organizations.  The Mid-Hudson REDC considered Bow Tie to be a priority project in this round of funding.

“These funds will make a huge difference as we work with developers on a signature downtown redevelopment project,” said Mayor Rob Rolison.  

Ben Moss, CEO of Bow Tie Cinemas said “We are excited the project is moving forward and appreciative of the city’s forward-thinking approach to reinvigorating downtown.”  Bow Tie is family-owned with Moss serving as the fourth generation the business.  

Bow Tie is the nation’s oldest movie theater chain, having started in 1900.  They operate theaters in Colorado, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, and New York. 

The name Bow Tie comes from the company’s flagship theater located at Broadway and 7th Avenue in Manhattan, at a spot considered the “Bow Tie of Times Square.”

In addition to the Bow Tie funding, the REDC awarded the city $100,000 to update its comprehensive plan and zoning laws as well as $100,000 for a sewer inflow and infiltration study.