IBM Fellow elected to Marist board

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(photo: from Marist College video)

POUGHKEEPSIE – The Marist College Board of Trustees elected Donna Dillenberger to the Board during its February meeting.  She will participate in her first meeting as a Trustee in May.

Dillenberger has had a distinguished career at IBM, currently serving as IBM Fellow at the company’s Research Center in Yorktown Heights and CTO of Systems Research for Hybrid Cloud.  Her focus is on machine learning, counterfeit detection, cloud security and availability, and enterprise systems.  In the past, Dillenberger has worked on machine learning models for financial, insurance, retail, and healthcare industries, and has designed new features for systems scalability and availability.  The new trustee is the author of numerous research publications and holds multiple patents, becoming a Master Inventor at IBM.  In recognition of Dillenberger’s work, IBM’s CEO appointed her an IBM Fellow, the highest technical honor at the company.  IBM Fellows are given broad latitude to identify and pursue projects.  In the history of IBM, only 317 people have received such a distinction. 

 

The College has had a long and fruitful partnership with the IBM Corporation, including a 30-year Joint Study, and has been at the forefront of enterprise, cloud, and quantum computing education.  Marist President Dennis Murray noted that Dillenberger will bring an invaluable perspective to Board discussions.  “Donna’s expertise in cutting-edge technologies will be a huge asset to the Marist Board.  Her insights into strategic areas such as cloud computing and cybersecurity will be crucial to the College’s decision-making and future planning.  Marist is fortunate that Donna is willing to share her talents with us.”

 

Dillenberger received her BS in mathematics from New York University and an MS in computer science from Columbia University.  She was an Adjunct Professor at Columbia’s Graduate School of Engineering and was a lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Stanford University.