Resorts World Catskills to open three casino dealer schools

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

THOMPSON – When the Resorts World Catskills Casino opens next March, it will need 600 table game dealers to staff the floor and parent company Empire Resorts is going to operate three casino schools to train people for the positions.
The free training will be held at locations in Rock Hill and Ellenville in Sullivan and at Stewart International Airport in Orange County.
Empire Resorts’ Executive Vice President Charles Degliomini said they expect to fill those positions prior to the opening of the casino.
“We will obviously put more people through the school than the 600,” Degliomini said. “It is not a guarantee of employment that you attend the school. At the end of your training you will have to audition and once you audition and successfully pass you will be eligible for a job offer.”
The minimum course at the training school will be 20 hours per week for six weeks, but the more time put into the studies, the more advanced games the applicant would be qualified to operate.
Everyone who will work at the casino will be required to have a New York State Gaming Commission license.
Information sessions about the training will be held at 7 p.m. on Monday, August 7 at the Ramada Sullivan Event Center, 283 Rock Hill Drive, in Rock Hill; at 7 p.m. on Monday, August 14 at the Orange County Emergency Services Center, 22 Wells Farm Road in Goshen; and at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 8 at Ellenville High School Auditorium, 28 Maple Avenue in Ellenville.
Sullivan County Legislature Chairman Luis Alvarez said Resorts World Catskills “is fulfilling its promise to the people of Sullivan County to provide jobs and boost the local economy.”
Orange County Executive Steven Neuhaus said the casino resort “is playing an important role in the economic development of the region.”
Ulster County Executive Michael Hein said the “invisible boundaries between counties should not stand in the way of helping our residents and communities prosper.”